Long Family of Wiltshire

500 years of history

Emma Burgar


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Joined Nov 26 2011
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England
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Long Family of Wiltshire

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4 Comments

Reply Cheryl Nicol
12:56 AM on November 28, 2011 
Emma, that is excellent that your father will have his DNA tested. We probably are all related somewhere along the line, if we could get back far enough. 5th cousins once removed is still a pretty good recipe for your offspring to have the right number of everything - fingers, toes, heads, etc. That must've been an interesting discovery!!
Reply Emma Burgar
7:22 PM on November 27, 2011 
Hi Cheryl

Thanks for this. My father is very interested in doing the DNA test. Thanks for help. Looking forward to your book being available.
Certainly seems that most of the Long lines fizzle out with all girls. We are waiting to see if my brother has a son this time, else our Long line will wither away as well. Talking of inbreeding in the Longs, I have discovered, since undertaking this massive task, that my husband and I are related (only 5th cousins once removed so not so terrible!:) I expect many people are similarly related if only they checked.
Reply Cheryl Nicol
10:40 PM on November 26, 2011 
Emma, a DNA test on a male member of your Long family might shed some light on the origins of your line. Check out my post on the Long DNA project. The more Longs who have the test, the more chances of finding those elusive roots. There are a number of sons named on the pedigrees whose death or burial is not recorded but who may have branched out to other areas.

The parish records for Bottisham show Longs as far back as the 16th century. According to the Wiltshire pedigrees Cambridgeshire is mentioned in connection with Sir Richard Long (d.1546) who was granted the manor of Shingay about 20 miles from Bottisham by Henry VIII. I'm not sure that this is significant though, especially since there were no male descendants beyond Sir Richard's son Henry of Shingay.
Cheryl
Reply Emma Burgar
7:45 PM on November 26, 2011 
I was born a Long and am currently trying to follow the family back. I cannot get any further than Richard Long who married Elizabeth Lawsell of Bottisham, Cambridgeshire, in 1721. My father insists that we are related to the Wiltshire Longs but has not yet provided any real proof. Does anyone know more than I do, particularly with regard to the Cambridgeshire Longs? Thanks Emma